SIPP PROGRESS

Current Value (As at 4th August 2017) = £148,846 including cash
Target for 31st December 2017 = £170,000 (was £153,000)
Value at commencement of this blog on 1st August 2012 = £51,684.02.
Monthly contributions since commencement of blog = 36mths @ £300 plus 23 months @ £750 = £28,050
Capital Growth = £148,846 less (£51,684.02 + £28,050) = £69,112+

The five investment lessons to financial security

Here are my top 5 decisions for you to consider.



1) Start your portfolio early
The earlier you start investing, the more time you have to compound your gains into a substantial sum. If you start investing the more likely it is you will accumulate a large share portfolio. Also, when you start investing early (say in your mid to late 20's) as you will be investing relatively small values, and major mistakes will be limited. The time you spend investing will be educational and invaluable for when your pension fund is at it's largest.



2) Save continuously to invest
Be careful with your expenditure. Try not to be profligate, and spend large amounts only on useful items. That way you can save the money not spent and invest it in your portfolio.
What I do is empty my bank account into my savings account on the day before I collect my salary cheque, and live on my monthly salary. That means (home made) sandwiches and re-heated leftovers for lunch; making my own ground-coffee at work rather than paying £2.50 per cup from the nearest coffee-shop; buying good quality and practical clothing (especially for the winter months). Consider finding a "look" for yourself, and building a smaller wardrobe around it.



3) Choose the investment method suitable for you - and stick with it
There are inumerable investment books on the market, but the one factor that keeps being repeated is finding great companies and holding-on to them - for years if necessary.
Great companies start small, so don't be afraid of investing in a small company if it is a strong business. Great companies also maintain their position by being well-run and profitable over long periods, so don't be afraid of investing in a great company even if it has been the market leader for 30 years - it may continue to be the market leader for another 30 years!



4) Put your money where your mouth is
When you find an investment opportunity that looks too good to be true, then back your judgement.
I try and keep my portfolio below 15 shareholdings as, when you own more than this, management becomes increasingly difficult. As such, I don't think you should have less than 5% of your portfolio value in a shareholding - and you should be prepared to invest over 20% of the value of your portfolio in a single shareholding.
Put your money where your mouth is - be bold.



5) Use every investment opportunity available
I own the house I live in - and I also own a property that I rent out.
I have a SIPP (Self Invested Pension Plan) - and I also invest the maximum annual allowance into an ISA.  Having a "rainy-day fund" is a good idea, but keep it realistic at no more than a maximum of a months earnings. If you want to own an expensive watch, buy a "vintage" watch at an auction. It will cost a fraction of the new price and, if you need to sell, you know that you will get back what you have paid.

No comments:

Post a Comment